4 Common Roof Designs for Your Home

Whether you’re looking to amplify your home’s aesthetic appeal, boost the potential resale value of your investment, or are simply overdue for a roof replacement, functionality and architectural style are essential factors in selecting a roof that is optimal for your home. Installing a roof that exemplifies your particular style and needs can not only protect your home’s occupants from the elements, but it can also provide economic advantages through energy-efficient characteristics. Here are four mainstream roofing options that homeowners are choosing for their living quarters.

Hipped Roof

Popular among cottages and bungalows, the hip roof is a defining element of popular styles like the American Foursquare, which dominated the marketplace from the mid-1890's to the late 1930's. This roofing option is comprised of sides that all slope upward and has no vertical ends. The area where each adjacent slope meets is known as the hip.

Pro: Sturdy by design, the hipped roof offers superior performance in regions that experience snow or high winds thanks to its inward sloping build. While there is a medley of materials suitable for constructing hip roofs, concrete tiles will best exemplify the natural elegance of this style, as well as safeguard your home from inclement weather.

Con: Due to the structural complexity of hip roofs, this design is not only on the pricier side, but the extra seams make it more vulnerable to leaking if inadequately installed.

Gable Roof

Simplistic in design, the gable roof mimics the shape of an inverted V. Architecturally speaking, this design can be tailored to fit a myriad of styles – Tudor, Colonial, Contemporary, Craftsman – the options are endless.  

Pro: From enhanced attic ventilation to effortless shedding of debris, water, and snow, gables can yield inexpensive labor costs compared to other roofing options due to its undemanding construction. The gable style can be leveraged purely for embellishment purposes, providing a simple framework for garages or porches.  

Con: Gable roofing is not a suitable solution for regions that commonly encounter intense storms or high winds. The design does not provide the reinforcement necessary to withstand severe weather.  

Mansard Roof

Emblematic of French architecture, the mansard is a four-sided hipped roof that has two prominent slopes on each side of the home. This style is popular among Neo-eclectic, French Manor and Country style homes, as well as in certain types of restaurants and apartment buildings.  

Pro: The mansard roof not only furnishes your home with artistic character, but it can also provide extra storage or living space in the uppermost portion of your residence due to the way it’s constructed. Additionally, mansard roofing is ideal for homeowners looking for a flexible solution that accommodates the changing needs of their family.

Con: It should be no surprise that installing this roof, with its opulent trimmings and decorative elements, can carry a hefty price tag. In addition to being expensive, the low-pitched section of the mansard is not ideal for snowy climates.

Flat Roof

Virtually level in design, flat roofs contain a maximum pitch of approximately 10 degrees. Traditionally associated with industrial or commercial buildings, the flat roof has recently become a trendy option among homes with modern or contemporary architecture.

Pro: Flat roofs are commonly used in conjunction with another design, such as the hipped roof, to highlight or accentuate certain characteristics of the home. It’s also a popular style for commercial businesses as HVAC systems can seamlessly sit on top of the flat surface of the roof.

Con: With little to no slope to speak of, flat roofs cannot effectively shed debris or snow. In addition, inclement weather can lead to subsequent erosion and damages because there is no vehicle to carry water off of the roof’s surface.

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